Nahe, Rheinhessen, Franconia, and the Pfalz

  • Here is David Schildknecht's review: 'A one-off Schafer-Frohlich 2010 Bockenauer Riesling halbtrocken represents 500 liters from a promising steep parcel in the Stromberg acquired two years ago and among the estate’s first-picked Rieslings of the vintage. (Unfortunately, easily every second old vine there was afflicted with black rot and the entire vineyard was ripped out for replanting after this harvest. Frohlich has high expectations for the site, but it will take some years for young vines to realize them.) This fermented until the end of May, even then leaving behind 17 grams of residual sugar. Narcissus and peony offer an alluring floral dimension to the aromas such as I did not perceive in any other dry wines of this year’s collection. Ripe peach and grapefruit inform a lush palate, and transparently permit subtly smoky, flinty as well as persistently floral notes to shine through in a lingering finish whose sense of invigoration is further enhanced by the chew of apple skin. This impeccably-balanced, outstanding value Riesling should perform well for at least the next half dozen years. ' 91 points
  • Nectar of the Gods.
  • This cuvee in 2011 has returned to the realm of loveliness that this often overachieving cuvee regularly exhibits.  Deelish. In stock.
  • A spatlese of Baroque intensity and weight, with intense palate staining minerality.  The 2011 collection at Wagner Stempel is the best since the amazing 2007s.  And now at terrific pricing, never yet seen in the US.  Jamonit! Here is David Schildknecht's review: "From a high-elevation, acid-retentive parcel that is routinely tapped for this bottling, Wagner’s 2011 Siefersheimer Heerkretz Riesling Spatlese exudes overripe pear and quince garlanded in lily-of-the-valley and honeysuckle, all of which migrate to a delicate, creamy, and overtly sweet yet infectiously juicy palate. Lime and tangerine introduce both a modicum of refreshment and – in candied rind form – of confection. This was pressed very gently and the must cooled to slow-down the fermentation, which was then stopped after reaching a mere 7.5% alcohol. It should prove deliciously fascinating to follow this for at least 15-20 years." 91 points In stock.
  • As good as it gets... Here is Gilman's review: "The 2012 Felseneck Kabinett is a really pretty and dancing example of its Prädikat, with the grapes for this bottling coming from the very first Riesling harvested by the estate. The bouquet is a very pretty and lilting mélange of apple, pear, wild yeasts, petrol, slate and a topnote of white flowers. On the palate the wine is medium-full, pure and filigreed, with fine focus, nice intensity of flavor and very fine length and grip on the bright and dancing finish. The must weight here is of course well into Spätlese range, but Tim Fröhlich has really done an impressive job to give this wine a true Kabinett sensibility. Lovely wine. 2013-2030. 92." In stock.
  • Wagner Stempel's other grand cru dry wine, this too is majestic in 2011.  YUMMO! Here is David Schildknecht's review: "The Wagner-Stempel 2011 Siefersheimer Hollberg Riesling Grosses Gewachs is based largely on the oldest vines in that site, and is, interestingly, the driest-ever rendition of this bottling, at a mere three grams residual sugar (but still at only 13.3% alcohol). One could certainly argue that extreme dryness has emphasized the mineral aspects of this wine’s flavors, if by “mineral” one thinks of an overtly stony character that also emphasizes the wine’s overall austerity. But the dynamic, interactive and alluring senses of “mineral” so vividly displayed in the corresponding Porphyr bottling are here nowhere in evidence. Against the aforementioned background of stoniness, ripe winter pear and persimmon, lime and grapefruit stand out with pungency a piquancy borne of pips, pits, and rinds. Yet for all of the chewy phenolics and hints of bitterness here, I perceive simultaneously a silken textural background to this well-stuffed Riesling in which both fruit and stone cling with impressive persistence. I would expect it to be worth following for the better part of a decade." 91points In stock.
  • Wow this is impressive.  Pinot blanc grown on volcanic soils, fairly low yields.  Power and complexity.  Delicious. In stock.
  • The more that I taste the Fürst wines, the more that I am blown away by the single most compelling examples I have experienced of zen power-without-weight complexity in Pinot Noir to be found in Germany. His reputation in Europe is that of the finest estates in all of Germany, yet in the US he is virtually an unknown entity. As a bonkers fanatical Pinot Noir lover working with over 50 estates in Burgundy, I can unequivocally state that any serious Burgundy lover would be remiss to not at least check in on exactly what I and oooodles of other wine lovers/critics are talking about, as his Grand crus are worthy of every bit of consideration relative to their French counterparts. I am particularly gaga over his Klingenberger Schlossberg vineyard, a Chambollean example of airy treble toned mineral intensity, with impossibly gorgeous tiny red fruited inner mouth perfume and weightlessness. The vineyard itself is as majestic a site as any you will ever encounter, its STEEP sandstone terraces carved into the hillside reminiscent of Côte Rôtie. With the amount of manual work and cost required to work such land, it is not a proposition one approaches to make money, even at these eye popping prices. As Paul told me, he does it for love and to preserve such a majestic and remarkable heritage. His 2013 Schlossberg, offered here, won Pinot Noir (aka Spätburgunder in German) of the year last year in the Gault Millau, as it routinely breaks hearts of Pinot lovers everywhere, in every single vintage. For those who want to check out what the Schlossberg is about but who can't pony up to the Grand cru pricetag, I would steer you towards the ortswein (villages) level Klingenberger bottling, which is essentially declassified Schlossberg from young vines....
  • The more that I taste the Fürst wines, the more that I am blown away by the single most compelling examples I have experienced of zen power-without-weight complexity in Pinot Noir to be found in Germany. His reputation in Europe is that of the finest estates in all of Germany, yet in the US he is virtually an unknown entity. As a bonkers fanatical Pinot Noir lover working with over 50 estates in Burgundy, I can unequivocally state that any serious Burgundy lover would be remiss to not at least check in on exactly what I and oooodles of other wine lovers/critics are talking about, as his Grand crus are worthy of every bit of consideration relative to their French counterparts. I am particularly gaga over his Klingenberger Schlossberg vineyard, a Chambollean example of airy treble toned mineral intensity, with impossibly gorgeous tiny red fruited inner mouth perfume and weightlessness. The vineyard itself is as majestic a site as any you will ever encounter, its STEEP sandstone terraces carved into the hillside reminiscent of Côte Rôtie. With the amount of manual work and cost required to work such land, it is not a proposition one approaches to make money, even at these eye popping prices. As Paul told me, he does it for love and to preserve such a majestic and remarkable heritage. His 2013 Schlossberg, offered here, won Pinot Noir (aka Spätburgunder in German) of the year last year in the Gault Millau, as it routinely breaks hearts of Pinot lovers everywhere, in every single vintage. For those who want to check out what the Schlossberg is about but who can't pony up to the Grand cru pricetag, I would steer you towards the ortswein (villages) level Klingenberger bottling, which is essentially declassified Schlossberg from young vines....
  • Outrageously complex dry Riesling from the famed red soils of the Rothenberg. In stock. Winner of the Berlin Riesling Cup for best dry German wine of '13.
  • In what has to be considered the house specialty, the Ungeheuer is the largest holding for the Mosbachers who possess 1.8 hectares in total from morcellated bits of contrasting soil content/character throughout the vineyard. With this large palette to choose from, they vinify all of the pieces separately, and then blend together the very best bits of the site to create an even more complex whole. And trust me folks, they succeed masterfully in doing so.....My note for the '15 : "WOW. A fascinatingly complex nose is at once deep, powerful, and reticent, hinting at the evolutionary potential yet to come; this is clearly a wine of deep old vine substance. In the mouth, it is wonderfully long and mineral driven, with an undeniable sense of class in a glass." 13.5% alc. My note for the 2013: "WOW. Even higher acidity than the 2015, this comes across as even more precise and filigree. Class in a glass!" 13% alc. Let me just say that you can and should get what you can justify and thank me later.....little * stars awarded for both the 2013 and 2015. "Sage and marjoram, pit-tinged white peach and apricot mark the pungently penetrating nose. Hazelnut and hickory add to the piquancy of fruit pit on a satiney palate, while resinous herbal impingements add invigoration to a refreshingly juicy finish of glowing yet simultaneously cooling intensity. There is impressive refinement of texture as well as of flavors here and a wealth of subtle stony and forest floor suggestions to keep you occupied in contemplation. “With a hectare and a half of Ungeheuer,” explains Sabina Mosbacher, “we have greater potential for selectivity than with our other best sites." 93 points David Schidknecht for the 2014, NOT THE 2015/2016 OFFERED HERE